Module 2: Making CAB a Way of Life

 

Total estimated seat time for the learner (Individual Contributors): 22.4 mins

Total estimated seat time for the learner (Managers): 58 mins

Frame 1: Title Frame

  • Mahindra logo + Lead to Win (static frame; minimal animation)
  • Title animation

 

Making CAB a Way of Life

(5 – 8 seconds animation)

Start button (with an animated arrow pointing to it)

——————————————————————————————–

Frame 2: Course Intro

Approximate seat time for the learner: 0.8 mins

Have you ever wondered why and how some organisations consistently deliver market-leading products and services that delight their customers? Or have you ever tried to build a team that will always exceed its goals and KPIs? In other words, have you ever wondered what drives consistent and superlative success?

If you have, this course is intended to guide you towards meeting that end. Specifically, in this module, we seek to:

  • Explore how organisational cultures develop, including why culture matters
  • Identify how much of a way of life CAB is for us individually
  • Learn how to make CAB a way of life for us as individuals and for our team

 

Without much ado, then, let’s begin our exploration of….*

———————————————————————————————————————–

Frame 3: How to Make CAB a Way of Life*

Please choose from the options below.

I am:

An Individual Contributor  /  A Manager

———————————————————————————————————————–

Frame 4: It’s All About Culture

Approximate seat time for the learner: 7.5 mins

Strategy guru Peter Drucker once said, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”

What does he mean by that? Simple: an organisation can have ambitious goals and brilliant strategies and plans, but it is vital to note one undeniable fact: it isn’t only strategies, plans and budgets that help an organisation meet its goals. It is people that do. Strategies, plans and budgets are inanimate, and they can accomplish nothing on their own. It is every person in that organisation consistently exhibiting the right behaviours that enable strategies and plans to succeed.

And if success must be consistently experienced, then the behaviors and actions that facilitate such goal achievement must become the norm for all concerned; it must form the very organisational culture. For what is culture if not a way of life of a people?

We had requested Mr Hemant Sikka, Mahindra Leadership Team Member, for his thoughts on this matter. Please click on the “View Video” button on your screen to hear him speak on this topic.

*

As Mr Sikka rightly shared, CAB must become this great organisation’s very culture. Especially considering the hypercompetitive and hyperlocal market that we operate in.

Culture is vital for organisational success.

But how do great cultures get established? Ah, that’s what we will explore in the next section of this module. Please click on the Next button to proceed.

———————————————————————————————————————-

Frame 5.a. How Cultures Form

Approximate seat time for the learner: 1.5 mins

When you observe the way of life of a country, a city, or even a tiny locality, you will find similar types of houses and observe that people will dress similarly. They celebrate the same festivals in the same way, primarily eat similar food, etc. These practices come together to form the culture of the people in that country, city or locality.

The exact parallel works for organisational culture development. When all employees in the organisation adopt the same values and practice the same behaviours consistently, these then form an organisational culture.

Culture building – whether societal or organisational – begins with people, and making CAB the culture at Mahindra then starts with you. That means that you, as a part of this organisation, must model the behaviour that you expect your colleagues to also practice. As Mahatma Gandhi taught, you must “be the change you want to see.”

In the next section of this module, we would like you to reflect and identify how well you are currently living out CAB in your professional life. Please click on the Self-Reflection Exercise link to undertake an activity to help meet this end.

Happy introspecting!

———————————————————————————————————————-

Frame 5. b. How Cultures Get Built

Approximate seat time for the learner: 1.75 mins

When you observe the way of life of a country, a city, or even a small locality, you will find similar houses and observe that people will dress similarly. They celebrate the same festivals in the same way, primarily eat similar food, etc. These practices come together to form the culture of the people in that country, city or locality.

The exact parallel works for organisational culture development. When all employees in the organisation adopt the same values and practice the same behaviours consistently, these then form an organisational culture.

Culture building – whether societal or organisational – begins with people. Turning CAB into a way of life in Mahindra starts with you.

That means that you, as a leader-manager, must model the behaviour you expect from your team members. As Mahatma Gandhi taught, you must “be the change you want to see”

Later in this module, we will look at how leaders can help their team members live out CAB. However, it will help first to reflect and identify how well we are currently living out CAB in our professional life. Please click on the Self-Reflection Exercise link to undertake an activity to help meet this end.

———————————————————————————————————————

Frame 6: How Well Do I Live Out CAB? Self-Reflection Activity

Frame Header: How Well Do I Live Out CAB? Self-Reflection Activity

Approximate seat time for the learner (including the exercise): 11.5 mins

We’ve considered 10 minutes for the exercise

Now, we may all grasp what CAB is at an intellectual level. However, the proof of the pudding is in its eating. And, for starters, it will help to understand how we stack up against the desired ideal.

And that’s why we are sharing this self-reflection questionnaire with you.

Here’s what we request you to do:

Step 1: Please download the questionnaire using the “Download Activity” button

Step 2: Find a quiet place to reflect on the questions and accord yourself the score based on the rating scale mentioned. Please note: this exercise is for your own consumption, and you do not need to share the scores with anyone

Step 3:  Once you have completed the exercise, please move on to the section on interpreting your total score

*

Step 4: Once you wrap up the exercise, please return to this screen and

click on the “Proceed” button to progress to the next section in this module

Wish you a happy discovery!

———————————————————————————————————————-

Frame 7: Helping My Team Live Out CAB: Exercise Overview

Approximate seat time for the learner (including the exercise): 0.6 mins

In the preceding section, we looked at one of the two components of organisational culture-building that we must follow, namely how well we are living out CAB ourselves. In this section, we will learn how to help our team members live out CAB. Specifically, we will look at how to identify our team members’ strengths and development areas concerning CAB.

Once again, we will do this via an exercise to help us learn this skill. Please click on the “Take Exercise” button to commence

————————————————————————————————————————–

Frame 8. a.: Exercise: Helping Sonali Rate Her Team

Approximate seat time for the learner (including the exercise): 1 min 45 seconds

Here’s the exercise we had alluded to earlier:

What You are Required to Do

In this exercise, you play the role of Sonali, a Zonal Head with Classique Tractors, a tractor manufacturer, who manages Abhilasha and Abhir, two Sales Managers.

The case provides information on both team members. Here’s what you must do next:

Step 1. Study both cases

Step 2. Understand the ROFA scale used to rate team members

Step 3. Rate both of Sonali’s team members on CAB behaviours using the ROFA scale

Step 4: Compare your rating against that provided by behavioural experts”

*

The Scenario

The COVID-19 induced partial lockdown, the looming uncertainty concerning the monsoons, poor credit availability for farmers, and the fear of a recurrence of a COVID wave had negatively impacted product sales.

In February, the projections were 12% growth YOY.

Abhir and Abhilasha’s teams had been given *sales growth targets ranging between 6% and 14%, based on the past performance of respective areas and the estimated market potential.

The cumulative sales are at 1.2% growth, YOY.

That’s the situation with Sonali’s team. Now, you may revisit the scenario by clicking on the “Revisit Scenario” button or on either character’s image below to learn about how they have responded to the scenario. You must study both their responses to perform this activity effectively. *

   
Revisit Scenario   Abhir   Abhilasha

 

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Frame 8. b.: Case 1: Abhilasha

Approximate seat time for the learner: 2 min 05 seconds

*

———————————————————————————–

Characters:

Abhilasha – Assistant General Manager, Sales

Sakina and Anthony – Territory Sales Managers

———————————————————————————–

Panel header: Abhilasha had called her team of territory sales managers for a “visioning” session.

Abhilasha is standing around a table with her team of four individuals – two women and two men – seated around it. A whiteboard with some numbers is seen behind her on a wall.

————————————————————————————-

Abhilasha (Standing. Smiling broadly. Open body language. Learning forward slightly, and her eyes are open wide in eagerness – like when someone is delivering a pep talk):

“Now that I’ve shared why our organisation has chosen to embrace these stretch goals, I wanted to ask you if you have any questions about the goals or the reasons behind these goals.

—————————————————————————-

Anthony:

No questions for now from me. You’ve made things very clear.

—————————————————————————-

Abhilasha:

Good, then. You are a very talented bunch, and I believe in you. I know that if we continue to think positive, the universe will conspire to help us succeed.”

—————————————————————————————

Abhilasha (same demeanour as in the previous panel; wide-angle shot where all characters are visible):

“Only, let’s also spend a little time planning for our future targets. Specifically, I want to hear your insights on whether we might need to rework our sales projections based on current market realities, tehsil-level data and economic conditions. I also want to hear your inputs on possible plans to meet our targets.”

—————————————————————————————-

Panel header: Abhilasha spent sufficient time setting clear stretch goals for every team member

They are all seated around a table, looking at a laptop that Abhilasha is pointing to.

—————————————————————————————-

Sakina (Sakina, Abhilasha’s team member; looking worried; has her arms and legs crossed. Over the shoulder shot of Abhilasha.): “Abhilasha, how are we going to meet these numbers given the market conditions? Aren’t we being overly ambitious here?”

—————————————————————————————-

Abhilasha: (Sakina still has her arms and legs crossed. Abhilasha making eye contact with Sakina; still smiling. Leaning forward with her elbows on the desk. Wide, side-angle shot of both)

“Sakina, I know that these are challenging goals. However, we will surely meet our numbers if we open our minds to more creative ways of selling. For example, let’s increase our focus on cross-selling implements, farm advisory, vehicle loans and strengthening our customer loyalty program. Don’t you think that doing so will help us boost our numbers and offset a lot of the decline in core tractor sales?”

—————————————————————————————–

Anthony (Abhilasha’s team member. Still looking unconvinced):

“Well, all we can do is try.”

—————————————————————————————–

Abhilasha: (Leaning back in her chair; smiling)

“Yes, Anthony. We must try hard, harder than ever before, I must add. I want you to share revised individual sales projections and plans based on all our discussions today within the next two weeks. If needed, we’ll meet again to discuss our plans. Could you guys do that?”

—————————————————————————————–

Panel header: The team agreed to try.

Two members of the team are seen shrugging their shoulders. One gives a thumbs up, and the other sits with his arms folded across her chest.

—————————————————————————————-

Panel header: Abhilasha ends with a motivational speech

Abhilasha: (Smiling. Arms open in front of her like a preacher. Wide-angle shot where all of them are seen)

“Yes, things look bad, but let’s continue to dream big”.

Screen fades to the following options

 

   
Revisit Scenario   Abhir   Revisit Abhilasha

 

—————————————————————————————-

Frame 8. c.: Case 2: Abhir

Approximate seat time for the learner: 3 min 05 seconds

Sonali and Abhir are seen seated across a table. Wide, side-angle shot.

Panel header: “Abhir was just wrapping up a meeting with Sonali, his Zonal Head.”

Sonali (Looking serious): “So, Abhir, these targets are extremely tough given the market conditions. However, are you willing to take them on?”

Abhir (smiling): “Absolutely, Sonali. I’m excited about them!”

—————————————————————————————

Abhir is seen in a meeting with four elderly gentlemen

Panel Header: “Two days later, Abhir had convened a meeting with his dealers.

—————————————————————————————

Wide-angle shot of Abhir speaking with the dealers. They are seated around the table.

Brijesh (one of the dealers, looking a little annoyed, but not overly so): “Abhir, you have finally agreed to this meeting. It’s been almost eight months now that we, your dealers, had been requesting to meet with you to share our difficulties.”

————————————————————————————–

Close-up of Nirav.

Nirav (another of the dealers, looking distressed): “Yes, Abhir. We, your dealers, have been trying to convey how the 12% growth target you set for us is unrealistic.”

—————————————————————————————-

Nirav (shot from a different angle; looking distressed): “I mean, how do you expect us to meet these targets given the current market situation? We do not have enough money to float credit to farmers, who are dealing with lots of uncertainties themselves. Just wait and watch: there will be bad debts galore piling up soon.”

———————————————————————————–

Krishna is seated towards Nirav’s right side. Both of them are visible in the frame

Brijesh (leaning forward as though agreeing with Nirav. Pointing towards Nirav as he speaks): “I agree with Nirav. These stretched targets that you are giving us are non-sensical. We are all very displeased with Classique Tractors and with you.

————————————————————————————

Brijesh (shot from a different angle; leaning forward as though agreeing with Nirav. Pointing towards Nirav as he speaks): In fact, we had been requesting this meeting because we had so many ideas on how we could possibly increase sales, but you seemed to be least interested in our ideas and insights.”

————————————————————————————

Wide-angle frame of all the characters. Over the shoulder shot of the person seated across Abhir, who is the frame’s focus.

Abhir (Seated with his elbows on the table, arms open, smiling) “I hear you all, and I must say that you are justified in feeling what you are. But I have a plan of action to help us meet these stretched targets, and it involves hitting the ground running and delivering to the maximum.”

————————————————————————————–

Panel heading: Abhir discussed his sales plan at length with his dealers

They are all seen looking at a laptop with a PowerPoint slide displaying a set of three graphs and five bullet points. The slide header reads “Quarter 1 Sales Projection and Plan”.

Over-the-shoulder shot of Abhir. Two other people’s silhouette is seen in the panel corners. The focus is the laptop.

————————————————————————————–

Abhir (wide-angle shot. Elbows on the table. Open arms. Smiling and looking at the dealers): “To conclude our discussion, our focus should be to deliver as per customer needs. If this is the target set, let’s proactively work towards achieving it.

Abhir (close-up. Front angle. Elbows on the table. Open arms. Smiling and looking at the dealers): “If you notice my plans, it involves quick decisions and swift actions to delight our customers”.

—————————————————————

Nirav (smiling): “I must grant you this. If we can make your plans a reality, it will delight our customers because it does involve quick decisions and swift actions.

Nirav: (smiling; different angle) What I want you to focus on is frequent update and plan revision meetings, something that you fail to do consistently, though.”

————————————————————————————-

Abhir (Holding his hands up in apology): Point noted, Niravji. I recognise that I often fail to follow through on my commitments towards my plans.”

———————————————————————————–

Panel Heading: Twenty minutes later, Abhir bid goodbye to his dealers.

Abhir is seen smiling and shaking hands with one dealer as another is seen exiting the room.

————————————————————————————

Abhir (seated back in his chair, biting on his lip; thinking – this is a thought bubble) “Honestly, I think we will manage a growth rate of 5-6%, at best, which, given the circumstances, would be pretty good.”

Screen fades to the following options

   
Revisit Scenario   Revisit Abhir   Revisit Abhilasha Proceed

 

———————————————————————————————————

Frame 8.d.: What You Are Expected to Do

Approximate seat time for the learner (including the exercise): 10 mins

(we’ve considered 8 minutes for the offline ROFA scale-based rating activity)

“Now that you are done studying Abhilasha and Abhir’s cases, please assist Sonali in rating her team members on CAB behaviours. Specifically, you must use the ROFA scale to rate both Abhilasha and Abhir on how effectively you observe them practising Collaboration, Agility and Bold in their respective interactions as depicted in the two cases.

A quick input: ROFA is an acronym that stands for Rarely, Often, Frequently and Always, and the ROFA scale, as you can tell, rates behaviours on the frequency or consistency with which the said behaviour is displayed by the individual being assessed.

So, if you rarely see the individual practising a specific behaviour, you will rate them an R. If you observe them consistently and without fail to practice some behaviour, you will rate them an A and so on.*

So, now, please rate Abhilasha and Abhir on the ROFA scale for CAB behaviours by using the Case Study Assessment Form, which you can access from the Download button provided below. You may also revisit the scenario or either of their cases by using the buttons below.

Once you complete your assessment, please return to this screen and click on the Next button to test your scores against those provided by a team of behavioural experts.

Download     Revisit Scenario     Revisit Abhir     Revisit Abhilasha     Next

———————————————————————————————————–

Frame 8. e.: Our Experts’ Rating and Case Study Debrief

Approximate seat time for the learner: 5 mins 10 seconds

Okay, you’ve rated Abhilasha and Abhir on CAB behaviours using the ROFA scale.

Now, here’s how our team of behavioural experts have rated both individuals in the case study on CAB behaviours. You can download a summary of the rating provided by the respective team members for ease of reference by clicking on the Download button below.

Download

Now, before we study what ratings our experts have given each of the two characters from the case, please note a critical point: Rating any individual using the ROFA scale involves a degree of subjectivity because each of us can interpret behaviours differently or feel differently about what might constitute a valid rating in each situation. There can be no definite and objective right or wrong rating in such cases. What will determine the accuracy of your ratings, though, is:

  1. How keenly you have been observing your team members and journalling incidents of them practising a given behaviour
  2. How deeply you are reflecting upon these incidents while performing the rating exercise

That said, let’s study how our experts have rated Abhilasha and Abhir on CAB behaviours.

On Collaboration, which, we at Mahindra define as,

  1. How we successfully share information with others,
  2. How we leverage each other’s strengths, and
  3. How open we are to other people’s perspectives and views; our experts noted that Abhilasha has:
  4. Shared all necessary information with others, and
  5. Taken inputs from other stakeholders on how they could meet the challenging sales targets

Considering these points, our experts rated Abhilasha an F on Collaboration.

Abhir, on the other hand, as noted by his dealers in this clip, rarely seems to meet and communicate with or solicit their views on sales target achievement. The meeting we viewed was his first with his dealers in ten months. Considering this, our experts have rated him an R on Collaboration.

Moving on to Agility, which we, at Mahindra, define as 1. Our responsiveness to change, 2. Proactiveness in taking initiatives, and 3. Taking swift decisions and actions to delight the customers, we observe that Abhir’s plans – as stated by him and validated by his dealers, involves quick decisions and swift actions to delight the customer. Considering this, our team of experts rated him an F on Agility.

Abhilasha, though, seems to lack the decisiveness required, given the circumstances. She has requested her team to come back with their plans two weeks hence and declared openness to yet another meeting to discuss these new plans. Again, given the stringent targets and the tight timelines, Abhilasha’s behaviour betrays a lack of Agility. Our experts thus rated her an R on Agility based on the information contained in the case.

Lastly, moving on to Bold, which we, at Mahindra, define as

  1. Our ability to think big,
  2. How we set challenging and realistic objectives, and
  3. How we meet commitments, Abhilasha, you observe, has willingly embraced a stretch target and convened a “visioning” exercise to meet this target. Her behaviour points to an individual willing to think big, set challenging objectives and develop commitments to meet such goals. Based on these behaviours. our experts felt that she, thus, deserved at least an F on Bold.

Abhir, similarly, is focused on big goals, but the case painted him as someone who has previously skipped on the commitments he makes in service of these goals. Our experts thus scored him an O on Bold.

That was how our experts rated Abhilasha and Abhir on CAB behaviours. Compare your ratings to theirs and check where your respective ratings match or digress. Reflect upon why any such discrepancy might exist.

If you are done with this exercise, please click on the Proceed button to move to the next section in this module.

——————————————————————————–

Frame 8.f.: Rating Your Team on CAB Behaviours: Active Experimentation Exercise

Approximate seat time for the learner (including the exercise): 12 mins

(We’ve considered 10 minutes for the Active Experimentation exercise)

 

So far in this module, you have undertaken an activity to identify how well you live out CAB currently as a professional. You have also gone through a case study to learn how to assess one’s team members on CAB behaviours.

The latter, though, was only a hypothetical situation. It’s time for you to try your hand at bringing the lesson on rating people on CAB behaviours into your own reality. Specifically, we wish to request you to try your hand at rating each of your team members on CAB behaviours. We have created a form to help you do just this, which you can access by clicking on the Download button below.

After you are done downloading this form, *please

  1. Make multiple copies of this form, one for each member of your team
  2. Fill in your team member’s name and the date of the exercise
  3. Read the definition of each behaviour
  4. Recollect any incidents of your team member practising the behaviour in question. Refer to any incidents that you might have documented of these behaviours
  5. Based on your reflections under Point 4, provide your team member with a rating on the behaviour under consideration
  6. Repeat this procedure for all three behaviours and all your team members
  7. Lastly, run your ratings by your manager for their inputs as well

 

We wish you all the very best with this critical exercise.

Once you are done performing this activity, please return to this screen and click on the Next button to proceed.

———————————————————————————————————————-

Frame 9.a.: Conclusion

Approximate seat time for the learner: 0.75 mins

Thank you for sparing your time to complete this module. We are sure you have taken away a whole lot of value from this module.

Remember, you must commit to making CAB a way of life – a culture – at Mahindra. It is the only way we will thrive in this hypercompetitive world. As management guru Peter Drucker once said, “Unless commitment is made, there are only promises and hopes.”

We wish you all the very best in making CAB a way of life for yourself and through you in Mahindra.

————————————————————————————————————————–

Frame 9.b.: Conclusion

Approximate seat time for the learner: 1.15 mins

As we come towards the end of the module, we’d like to mention that once you, as a manager, identify an individual’s development areas concerning CAB, you must conduct a detailed and structured behaviour improvement dialogue. We will cover the nuances of such improvement conversations in a subsequent module.

Thank you for sparing your time to complete this module, though. We are sure you have taken away a whole lot of value from this module.

Remember, you must commit to making CAB a way of life – a culture – at Mahindra. It is the only way we will thrive in this hypercompetitive world. As management guru Peter Drucker once said, “Unless commitment is made, there are only promises and hopes.”

We wish you all the very best in making CAB a way of life for yourself and through you in Mahindra.

Please click on the Complete Course to close this module.

.